DOM Modification

Using jQuery’s Data APIs

In the beginning (well, beginning with jQuery 1.2.3 in early 2008) there was the jQuery.data() API. It offers a way to associate JavaScript data — strings, numbers, or any object — with a DOM element. As long as you manipulate the DOM element with jQuery, the library ensures that when the DOM element goes away, […]
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Now you see me… show/hide performance

I just got back from the jQuery conference in San Francisco. Wow, what an event. In addition to some incredible talks, I had the opportunity to speak with Rey Bango, Johnathon Sharp, and, of course, John Resig. Any conference where you get to talk to some of the most influential people in jQuery is a […]
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Accessible Showing and Hiding

Editor's Note: When I started this blog nearly three years ago, one of the first things I did was write a series on showing and hiding elements on a page. The posts were very basic, as was my knowledge at the time. At best, they demonstrated an incomplete answer to the question of how to […]
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Simple Tooltip for Huge Number of Elements

There are many, many jQuery tooltip plugins out there, and some of them are very good. But when someone on the jQuery Google Group asked (a year ago) which plugin could handle displaying tooltips for 2,000 links on a page, I wasn't able to find one. So, I decided to throw together a quick little […]
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43,439 reasons to use append() correctly

The .append() method is perhaps the most misused of all jQuery methods. While an extremely useful and easy method to work with, it dramatically affects the performance of your page. When misused, the .append() method can cripple your JavaScript code's performance. When used well, it'll keep your script humming along.
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Quick Tip: Dynamically add an icon for external links

A common feature I've seen on “web 2.0” sites and wikis is the "external link" icon: . While I'm not crazy about the idea of sticking these little images all over the HTML, they're a great candidate for using progressive enhancement. In our case, we can use jQuery to add the images pretty easily.
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