How to Use jQuery’s Mouse Methods

jQuery has 4 event methods that have to do with cursor movement. The methods are .mouseenter(), .mouseleave(), .mouseup() and .mousedown(). All of these methods can be used to trigger events and execute code based on when and where the user’s cursor moves. In terms of syntax, they’re fairly simple and straightforward to use, but they can also be really versatile and used to achieve some pretty cool functionalities and effects.

In this tutorial, we’re going to go over how to use each of the mouse event methods. Take a look at the code snippets below to for examples of how to use them in the context of your code.

.mouseenter() and .mouseleave()

The .mouseenter() and .mouseleave() methods are two that are often used together. You can probably guess what they do, but here’s a brief explanation. The .mouseenter() method is triggered when the cursor enters the selected element (here, the word “enters” means that the cursor moves over the element), and the .mouseleave() method is triggered when the cursor leaves, or stops moving over, the selected element.

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There are many different effects you can achieve with these two methods. To see an example of how you might use them, check out the code below:

$("h1").mouseenter(function(){
     $(this).css("color", "red");
})
$("h1").mouseleave(function(){
     $(this).css("color", "blue");
})

In the code snippet above, the color of the h1 element that the cursor moves over turns red when the cursor is on top of it. When the cursor moves off of it, the color of the h1 element changes to blue.

.mouseup() and .mousedown()

The .mousedown() event is triggered when the mouse button is pressed down over a selected element (essentially, this is very close to the .click() method), and the .mouseup() event occurs when the mouse button is released over a particular element. Basically, it’s a click and release type of deal. Like .mouseenter() and .mouseleave(), these two event methods are often used in conjunction with one another. To see an example of how you would use it, take a look at the code below:

$("p").mousedown(function(){
     $(this).css("color", "orange");
})
$("p").mouseup(function(){
     $(this).css("color", "green");
})

In the code snippet above, the text color of the p element changes to orange when it’s clicked, and green when the click is released.


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